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Biomedical Technologies: Spotlight on Biomedical Technologies
08:00am - 11:40am USA / Canada - Pacific - March 22, 2022 | Location: Pacific Ballroom: Section 21 (Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina)
Mark Mimee, Organizer, Presider; Dr. Shannon L Servoss, Organizer, Presider; Rahul Sheth, Organizer, Presider
Division: [BIOT] Division of Biochemical Technology
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Division/Committee: [BIOT] Division of Biochemical Technology

Advances in regenerative medicine are paving the way for developing more effective therapies for a wide range of diseases. The potential for repairing and regenerating multiple organs and cell types continues to drive novel solutions to improve human health. Talks in this session will focus on, but are not limited to, current developments in i) iPS and CAR T cell therapy, ii) tissue engineering, iii) cancer immunotherapy, and iv) biomaterial-based regenerative strategies.

Tuesday
3677857 - Keynote: Towards prevention of arrhythmias: Injectable hydrogel electrodes enable direct capture of inaccessible cardiac tissues
08:00am - 08:40am USA / Canada - Pacific - March 22, 2022 | Location: Pacific Ballroom: Section 21 (Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina)
Division: [BIOT] Division of Biochemical Technology
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Re-entrant arrhythmias are the leading causes of sudden cardiac death. Access to the coronary veins that cross the scarred region of the heart where reentrant circuits originate could provide improved pacing to prevent ventricular arrhythmias and circumvent the need for painful defibrillation. However, there are no pacing leads small enough to navigate these smaller tributaries and epicardial approaches have limited efficacy due to the greater mass and thickness of ventricular tissue. We have developed an injectable hydrogel electrode that can fill coronary veins to convert them into flexible electrodes that directly pace the inaccessible mid-myocardium. In our two-component system, hydrogel precursor solutions can be injected through a dual lumen catheter in a minimally invasive deployment strategy to provide direct access to the diseased regions with relative precision and ease. Mixing of the two solutions upon injection into the vein activates redox-initiated crosslinking of the gel for rapid in situ cure without an external stimulus. An ex vivo porcine model was used to identify the requisite viscosity and cure rate for gel retention and homogeneity. Ionic species added to the hydrogel precursor solutions conferred conductivity above target myocardium values that was retained after implantation. Successful in vivo deployment demonstrated that the hydrogel electrode filled the anterior interventricular vein with extension into small venous tributaries, far deeper into the mid myocardium than currently available lead placement. In addition to successful capture and pacing of the porcine heart, analysis of surface ECG tracings revealed a novel pacing paradigm not observed in traditional single-point pacing: capture of both myocardium and the Purkinje system. This combination is a pacing modality that most closely resembles native, healthy sinus conduction. Notably, this is the first report of an injectable electrode used to successfully pace the mid-myocardium and mimic physiologic conduction.
Tuesday
3648411 - Withdrawn
08:40am - 09:00am USA / Canada - Pacific - March 22, 2022 | Location: Pacific Ballroom: Section 21 (Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina)
Division: [BIOT] Division of Biochemical Technology
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid

Tuesday
3702685 - Highlighting the emerging topics in biomedical technologies
09:00am - 09:40am USA / Canada - Pacific - March 22, 2022 | Location: Pacific Ballroom: Section 21 (Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina)
Division: [BIOT] Division of Biochemical Technology
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Biochemical technology is changing rapidly, and this session will highlight the latest developments. In this talk, several emerging topics will be covered to highlight the variety of work in the biomedical technologies area of this evolving field.
Tuesday
Intermission
09:40am - 10:00am USA / Canada - Pacific - March 22, 2022 | Location: Pacific Ballroom: Section 21 (Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina)
Division: [BIOT] Division of Biochemical Technology
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid

Tuesday
Discussion
10:00am - 10:20am USA / Canada - Pacific - March 22, 2022 | Location: Pacific Ballroom: Section 21 (Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina)
Division: [BIOT] Division of Biochemical Technology
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid

Tuesday
3661711 - Intracellular kinetic modeling of SARS-CoV-2 for development of therapeutic treatment strategies
10:20am - 10:40am USA / Canada - Pacific - March 22, 2022 | Location: Pacific Ballroom: Section 21 (Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina)
Ranjan Srivastava, Presenter
Division: [BIOT] Division of Biochemical Technology
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
The pandemic spawned by the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the etiological agent of COVID-19, has had devastating worldwide repercussions. Numerous complementary strategies must be taken to address this issue and to ameliorate the consequences, including the use of therapeutics. To facilitate identification and development of therapeutics, it is critical to gain a better understanding of the fundamental viral dynamics of SARS-CoV-2. Such insight will allow for the rapid initial in silico assessment of therapeutics, including identification of potential high value molecules, as well as determination of optimal treatment strategies.

In this work, a systems virology approach was used to develop models of the intracellular kinetics of SARS-CoV-2. Using a mass action kinetics assumption, systems of ordinary differential equations were implemented to generate multiple models of varying subcellular resolution. Parameters were estimated based on data from the literature. Network topology was determined using the current understanding of SARS-CoV-2 molecular virology. Stability analysis was carried out to facilitate model discrimination.

Results of the best performing model showed qualitative behavior similar to that seen in experimental studies. The model, however, also provided insight into the behavior of molecular components whose dynamics have not been experimentally explored in detail. Unsurprisingly, the model indicated a dramatic rise in the amount of viral genome upon initiation of infection. As would be expected, a concomitant boost in the level of viral proteins was also observed. Interestingly, and somewhat surprisingly, in a relatively short period of time, the amount of viral genome within the cell began to decrease rapidly to a new much lower level. However, the level of genome was sufficiently high enough that, while the rate of net viral protein production slowed down significantly, overall viral protein levels continued to increase. It appeared that the primary reason that the viral genome level decreased was that they were being packaged for virion secretion rather than being used for viral protein synthesis. Ultimately, the initial rapid “priming” of the viral production system was sufficient enough such that, after reaching a critical point, viral resources were able to be primarily allocated towards virion release while the viral protein synthesis machinery continued growing, albeit at a slower rate and at lower overall levels.

Tuesday
Award Talk
10:40am - 11:40am USA / Canada - Pacific - March 22, 2022 | Location: Pacific Ballroom: Section 21 (Marriott Marquis San Diego Marina)
Division: [BIOT] Division of Biochemical Technology
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid