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Innovative Materials for Environmental Sustainability: Novel Adsorbents
08:00am - 10:00am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Thomas Murphy Ballroom Sections 1 & 2
Rafael Luque, Organizer, Universidad de Cordoba; Alexander Orlov, Organizer, Materials Science Engineerin; Alexander Orlov, Presider, Materials Science Engineerin
Division: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Division/Committee: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry

Improving the quality of human life without depleting the natural resources is the focus of environmental sustainability. This challenging task requires new approaches in designing new materials that can either have a reduced environmental footprint or contribute to environmental improvements, or preferably both. The focus of this symposium is to highlight the latest science and engineering that can have a transformative impact on our planet. Examples of innovative materials science and engineering can include the latest developments in more sustainable concrete synthesis and production, a new generation of air purifying and self-cleaning surfaces, advanced environmental catalysts, synthesis of novel eco-friendly materials for environmental remediation, conversion of organic waste into biodegradable plastic and other pioneering themes. Moreover, additional topics related to development of more efficient and environmentally friendly materials for sustainable energy production will also be included in this symposium.

Sunday
Introductory Remarks
08:00am - 08:05am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Thomas Murphy Ballroom Sections 1 & 2
Division: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid

Sunday
Innovative materials for environmental sustainability: From sustainable concrete removing pollutants to ceramics breathing out nanoparticles
08:05am - 08:35am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Thomas Murphy Ballroom Sections 1 & 2
Alexander Orlov, Presenter, Materials Science Engineerin; Shrish Patel; Haotian Yang
Division: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Removing NO2 from cement kilns can have tremendously beneficial effects on the environment and human health. Sequestering NO2 in demolished concrete is an innovative, cost-effective, and sustainable approach to remove NO2 flue-gas from cement kilns and other industrial plants to minimize their environmental impact. Another notable advantage of this approach was signified by our recent discovery of NO2 sequestered Recycled Concrete Aggregate (NRCA) acting as a corrosion inhibitor when recycled backed into a new concrete. The first part of this presentation focuses on NO2 sequestration by the waste concrete at elevated temperatures that are representative of those found in the cement kilns flue gas exhaust.
Another example of innovative materials includes doped ceramics that can breath out uniform nanoparticles that can be used to convert CO2 into fuels. Traditional methods of controlling morphology and size distribution of nanoparticles have significant drawbacks. For instance, capping and encapsulating agents are usually difficult to remove, resulting in surface contamination, while physical deposition methods are challenging to scale up. This presentation offers a unique approach to forming nanostructured surfaces by establishing new structure-property relations, where particle size, metal-oxide interfaces, and shape are tuned by a relatively simple yet novel and scalable approach. Modulation of reduction temperature, concentration, type of dopants, and the presence of oxygen vacancies will enable control of particle size and morphology, which are critical for achieving unique catalytic properties.

Sunday
Functionalized metal-organic frameworks for nitrogen recovery from fresh source-separated urine
08:35am - 08:55am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Thomas Murphy Ballroom Sections 1 & 2
Division: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Recovering nitrogen from source-separated urine has become a sustainable solution for wastewater management, as it can prevent eutrophication and provide fertilization products in the meantime. However, the majority of nitrogen in fresh source-separated urine exists in the form of urea which is difficult to be separated from water, and this has posed a great challenge for nitrogen recovery. In this work, a zirconium-based metal-organic framework (Zr-MOF) is rationally modified to provide both reacting sites to convert urea to ammonia in situ and adsorption sites to readily capture ammonium generated aforementioned, therefore serving as a versatile adsorbent platform for nitrogen recovery from fresh source-separated urine. On top of the excellent total nitrogen removal capability of this MOF-based adsorbent, captured ammonium ions can be furthered exchanged with sodium to regenerate the adsorbent and to yield ammonium solution as a ready-to-use fertilizer. This work opens up a new avenue of utilizing innovative nanomaterials by rational design as a solution for environmental sustainability.
Sunday
Withdrawn
08:55am - 09:15am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Thomas Murphy Ballroom Sections 1 & 2
Division: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid

Sunday
Selective recovery of ammonia nitrogen from wastewaters with transition metal-loaded polymeric cation exchange adsorbents
09:15am - 09:35am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Thomas Murphy Ballroom Sections 1 & 2
Brandon Clark, Presenter, Stanford University; William Tarpeh
Division: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
The presence of nitrogen compounds, such as ammonia and ammonium (total ammonia nitrogen, or TAN), in wastewater is concerning due to their contribution to eutrophication. Conventional microbial nitrification-denitrification is an energy-intensive process that is not able to recover TAN for reuse, converting TAN into dinitrogen gas. To achieve selective TAN removal and recovery, we modified commercial polymeric cation-exchange adsorbents by loading ion exchange sites with transition metal cations (divalent copper and zinc). Since divalent copper and zinc are known to form inner-sphere complexes with ammonia, we hypothesized that metal-ligand exchange drives selectivity towards ammonia adsorption, while nontarget cation exchange is inhibited by strongly bound transition metals on the ion exchange sites. Compared to commercial resins, metal-ligand exchange adsorbents exhibited higher ammonia removal capacity (8 meq/g) and recovery selectivity in binary equimolar solutions of TAN and K+, while transition metal elution was roughly 5%. However, in synthetic fresh urine solutions, divalent cation exchange increased transition metal elution and reduced ammonia adsorption. Considering optimal TAN concentrations (200-300 meq/L), pH (9-10), and composition (no divalent cations) for metal-ligand exchange, we identified hydrolyzed urine as a promising wastewater for selective TAN recovery using our metal-ligand exchange adsorbents. After adsorption with real and synthetic hydrolyzed urine solutions, we found that a two-stage sequential regeneration using pure water and potassium phosphate buffer recovered over 95% of adsorbed TAN, created a product effluent with up to 80-fold more TAN than sodium, and eluted negligible transition metal. When the resin encounters a regenerant pH that favors protonation of ammonia into ammonium (below 9.2), ammonia breaks its metal-ligand bond and elutes from the resin. This regenerant pair improves the energy efficiency of ion exchange processes compared to typical highly acidic or basic regenerants. To extend resin performance lifetime, we improved the process design by using a resin with tris(2-aminoethyl)amine functional groups to selectively capture the eluted transition metal. We then fed the metal back to the ligand exchange adsorbent for multiple-cycle metal reuse and close the selective TAN recovery process loop.
Sunday
Novel low-cost adsorbents for phosphate removal from freshwaters
09:35am - 09:55am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Thomas Murphy Ballroom Sections 1 & 2
Chandra Mouli Tummala, Presenter, Wayne State University; Timothy Dittrich
Division: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Increases in phosphate loads into freshwater rivers and lakes from agriculture and urban sources can make them prone to eutrophication. Prefiltration using the catch basin insert filters can be a viable solution to remove the excess phosphates entering the freshwaters. Catch basin insert filters have layers of filter media material that can remove the pollutant of interest using the adsorption process. Previous studies have shown FeO2 and MnO2 coated sorbents are effective for phosphate removal. In this study, we have coated polypropylene fabric with MnO2 and performed batch experiments to investigate its usage as a phosphate filter media that can be added into catch basin inserts. Results showed that the phosphate removal efficiency for MnO2 coated fabric was better than commercially available adsorbent filter media. Kinetic studies showed that the sorbent followed pseudo-second-order kinetics and Freundlich isotherm model fits revealed that the cooperative adsorption process is dominant. Thermodynamic calculation confirmed that phosphate adsorption onto MnO2 coated filter media is spontaneous. We have also developed other low-cost phosphate adsorbents from waste materials such as iron oxide coated walnut shells and pistachio nutshells to investigate a cost-effective sorbent where production can be scaled up to clean large amounts of agricultural and urban runoff.
Sunday
Concluding Remarks
09:55am - 10:00am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Thomas Murphy Ballroom Sections 1 & 2
Division: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid

Nanoparticle Interactions in Environmental Systems:
08:00am - 09:55am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B402
Adeyemi Adeleye, Organizer, University of California Irvine; Arturo Keller, Organizer, University of California, Santa Barbara; Dr. Yiming Su, Presider, University of California Los Angeles; Virender Sharma, Presider, Texas AM University
Division: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Division/Committee: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry

This session seeks leading edge research on the interactions of nanoparticles (metallic, carbonaceous, organic, and nanoplastics) with biogenic, geogenic, and anthropogenic components in the natural environment. The interactions and processes of interest include nanoparticle transformations in different media, surface accumulation of inorganic and organic substances, transport through biological membranes, and nanoparticle-induced redox reactions. Of particular interest are studies on novel nanoparticles (e.g., nanohybrids, nanocomposites, and metal-organic frameworks) (1) used in environmentally-relevant applications (e.g., agriculture, remediation, and CO2 capture), (2) incidentally generated from manufacturing (e.g. nanoplastics produced during 3D printing), or that reach the environment due to their use in outdoor environments (e.g., coatings, and personal care products). We also seek studies that address risk of exposure to nanoparticles, by human and ecological receptors.

Sunday
Introductory Remarks
08:00am - 08:05am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B402
Division: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid

Sunday
Opportunities of nanotechnology in sustainable agricultural practices
08:05am - 08:30am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B402
Dr. Yiming Su, Presenter, University of California Los Angeles; Xuefei Zhou; Yalei Zhang; Huan Meng; Tian Xia; Arturo Keller, University of California, Santa Barbara; Greg Lowry, Carnegie Mellon University; David Jassby
Division: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Nanotechnology has been increasingly recognized as an important approach to achieve sustainable development of agriculture, particularly in the field of fertilizers and pesticides innovation. However, to promote the practical application of nanotechnology, it is essential to evaluate the economic and environmental benefits of nanotechnology to different crops. In the present study, we carry out a cost-benefit analysis about the application of nano fertilizers and pesticides in comparison with conventional formulations, identify the potential areas for implementing nano fertilizers and pesticides, and propose future studies needed to pave the way for wide application of nanotechnology in agricultural practices.
Sunday
Nanotechnology-based agrochemicals for improved target delivery and use efficiency
08:30am - 08:50am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B402
Ramesh Raliya, Presenter
Division: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Agrochemicals providing nutrition and protection to plants are essential for food security. However, their low use efficiency, efficacy, and non-point impact causing environmental pollution are growing concerns both at the grower and consumer level. Major requiring nutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus having about 30-40% use efficiency, causing eutrophication and other soil-air-water related pollutions. Recent literature evidence that nanoparticles of metal, metal oxide, and non-metal polymer are being explored as an alternative to bulk agrochemicals for improving the use efficiency as well as an agronomic fortification. However, most of these studies are limited with respect to the impact on plants. However, successful commercial translation requires holistic investigation both with the system and surrounding environment where the nanoscale particle can possibly interact. In the present study, novel nanocomposite of nitrogen and phosphorus were synthesized that can be used as an ingredient for fertilizer. The nanocomposite was tested on legume and cereal crops for plant response, but also tested on earthworm, soil microbial diversity, population, and toxicological perspective. Resultant the nanoscale composite observed as an effective alternative to their bulk counterpart; it increases use efficiency while significantly lowering the amount of conventional fertilizer require at farm field. However, judicious use of nanoscale fertilizer is necessary from the desired safety and outcome perspective.
Sunday
Biomolecular corona formation on copper oxide nanoparticles in pumpkin xylem fluid
08:50am - 09:10am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B402
Division: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Coatings of biomolecules—biomolecular corona—acquired when nanoparticles interact with biological media, have been shown to influence the distribution, fate, and toxicity of nanoparticles in animal and bacterial systems. Mechanistic insight into the influence of biomolecular coronas on nanoparticle transport within plants is needed to understand the nanoparticle–plant interactions important for both the development of nano-enabled agriculture and to assess the impacts of inadvertent exposure to nanoparticles. We examined the interactions between copper oxide nanoparticles and pumpkin xylem fluid as a first step toward understanding biomolecular corona formation in plant vasculature systems. We find the corona formed is composed primarily of proteins, despite a higher concentration of carbohydrates in xylem fluid, and the most abundant proteins in the corona are not the most abundant ones in the xylem fluid. Additionally, the nanoparticle corona evolves over time with protein–nanoparticle interactions exhibiting long-term stability, while carbohydrate–nanoparticle interactions are mostly transient.
Sunday
Withdrawn
09:10am - 09:30am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B402
Division: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid

Sunday
Towards a general framework for quantitative assessment of the potential risks associated with soil release of reduced carbon species
09:30am - 09:50am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B402
Division: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Some reduced carbon species enriched in aromatic functionalities can provide ecosystem services when used as soil amendments. Charcoal has been used for this purpose for millennia. Biochar (biomass intentionally pyrolyzed for soil amendment) has been recently designed to mimic charcoal’s environmental benefits. Here we consider a third family of reduced carbon species that could be used for soil amendment: engineered carbon materials produced from natural gas pyrolysis (i.e. full decomposition of methane into solid carbon and hydrogen). We term these materials generically C0. C0 can be designed to be chemically similar to charcoal or biochar, with the aim of providing similar ecosystem services (improved soil water retention, improved nutrient retention, reduced fertilizer runoff, reduced soil CH4 and N2O production, etc.). Environmental risk assessment is a crucial first step before discussion of use of these materials as soil amendment. Here we begin this process by developing a procedure to assess the release of dissolved materials from C0. We report on the amount and chemistry of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) released by C0 subjected to a range of environmental aging treatments. Specifically, we subjected C0 to 1) 10-day UVA irradiation with light intensity of 50 µW/cm2, mimicking UV-driven reactions likely to occur in natural waters, 2) H2O2 oxidation (30% and 5%), mimicking natural, long-term environmental microbial oxidation, and 3) 10 mg L-1 monochloramine (NH2Cl) oxidation, mimicking reactions that could occur were C0 materials to inadvertently enter drinking water treatment systems. DOC released from C0 was < 2 mg L-1 regardless of aging method. This is significantly lower than DOC released from wildfire-derived charcoal (up to 70 mg L-1), soft wood biochar pyrolyzed at 550 and 700 °C, and commercial biochar under the same oxidation conditions. UVA 10 days is the most oxidizing treatment for C0. UVA-aged C0 had a relatively higher O/C ratio of 0.019±0.006. However, all three aging methods were incapable of significantly oxidizing C0. Next steps involve determining the chemical nature of DOC species released.
Sunday
Concluding Remarks
09:50am - 09:55am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B402
Division: [ENVR] Division of Environmental Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid

Sunday
Finding Yourself: Identifying a Career that Matches your Strengths and Values
09:30am - 01:00pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: A412
Session Type: Networking Events - In-person

Sunday
AGRO Coffee Talk
10:00am - 10:30am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Virtual Room
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Networking Events - Virtual
Division/Committee: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Sunday
ANYL Division Coffee Break Social
10:00am - 10:30am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Virtual Room
Division: [ANYL] Division of Analytical Chemistry
Session Type: Networking Events - Virtual
Division/Committee: [ANYL] Division of Analytical Chemistry