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Fourth CME NASA Symposium: Chemistry for Resilient Human Space Exploration: Advanced Materials: Industry Perspective
08:00am - 10:00am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: A313-A314
Dr. Michael A Meador, Organizer, Meador Aerospace Materials Group, LLC; Prof Robert Nolan, Organizer, The City University of New York; George Rodriguez, Organizer; Ksenia Takhistova, Organizer, Presider, CME; Tara M Ruttley, PhD, Presider; Ksenia Takhistova, Presider, CME; Prof Robert Nolan, Presider, The City University of New York; Mary Kirchhoff, Presider, American Chemical Society
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Division/Committee: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Tuesday
Introductory Remarks
08:00am - 08:01am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: A313-A314
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid

Tuesday
What can chemistry do to enable the next great leap in space science?
08:01am - 08:15am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: A313-A314
Jonathan Arenberg, Presenter
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
The space sciences are technologically limited. Many of the technical limitations on system performance lie in the properties of the materials the instruments and systems consist of. These properties have their roots in the chemistry. We will review some recent advances in space science and show how chemistry played both an enabling and limiting role. Understanding the limitations enables us to formulate critical questions that can be addressed by chemistry and when answered will help power the next great leap in space science.

Tuesday
ISS national lab and in space production applications
08:15am - 08:30am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: A313-A314
Dr. Kenneth Allen Savin, Presenter, CASIS
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Access to the microgravity environment of low Earth orbit offers industry production opportunities not possible terrestrially. This presentation will focus on ISS National Lab efforts around in-space production, manufacturing processes, and intellectual-property generation that enable new business growth and represent markets that could generate revenue from access to space. This is a unique opportunity to keep up with the production and IP opportunities for advanced products and pharmaceuticals. Examples of organizations that have partnered to support advanced materials or physical science investigations on the ISS National Lab are:

National Science Foundation
Adidas
Goodyear Tires
Delta Faucet
Made In Space/Redwire Space
Eli Lilly & Company
Merck
Hewlett Packard Enterprise
Lamborghini
Cobra Puma Golf
Lockheed Martin
Nickelodeon

Tuesday
Polymers for a resilient future
08:30am - 08:45am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: A313-A314
Anne Shim, Presenter
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
At BASF, one of the leading chemical companies, we are constantly developing novel materials and enhancing existing materials to meet the needs of our customers. This talk will give a brief overview of BASF and how we address the challenge of resiliency in polymers for everyday use.

Tuesday
Performance assessment and flight heritage of carbon nanotube based thermal interface
08:45am - 09:00am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: A313-A314
Dr. Craig Green, Ph. D, Presenter, Carbice Corporation
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
While greater functionality in the current generation of spacecraft has increased heat dissipation, thermal design in these systems is driven by design constraints that extend beyond the requirements of terrestrial applications. Effective spacecraft thermal design must account for the combined needs for simple and cost effective integration of large complex systems, along with the need to operate reliably and predictably in harsh environments for extended mission times without maintenance. We present a suite of space qualified thermal interfacing solutions based on a platform of polymer encapsulated vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays all covalently anchored to an aluminum foil substrate.

Tuesday
Industry panel on applications for advanced materials, energy and systems
09:00am - 10:00am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: A313-A314
Tara M Ruttley, PhD, Presenter; Ksenia Takhistova, Presenter, CME
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Leaders from CME and NASA will co-moderate industry panel for Advanced Materials, Energy and Systems

Fourth CME NASA Symposium: Chemistry for Resilient Human Space Exploration: Advanced Materials: Industry Perspective
10:30am - 12:30pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: A311-A312
Dr. Michael A Meador, Organizer, Meador Aerospace Materials Group, LLC; Prof Robert Nolan, Organizer, The City University of New York; George Rodriguez, Organizer; Ksenia Takhistova, Organizer, Presider, CME; Tara M Ruttley, PhD, Presider; Ksenia Takhistova, Presider, CME; Prof Robert Nolan, Presider, The City University of New York; Kevin McCue, Presider, American Chemical Society
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Division/Committee: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Tuesday
Advances in conversion type electrodes for lightweight batteries
10:30am - 10:45am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: A311-A312
Dr. Gleb Yushin, Presenter, Georgia Institute of Technology
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Specific energy density of Li-ion batteries based on intercalation compounds are closely approaching their limits. Conversion-type active materials offer an opportunity to triple specific energy, reduce their cost, and improve cell safety. These materials may be produced from safer, cheaper, and globally available resources and contribute to accelerated adoption of electric transportation. This talk will focus on the latest developments of both active and inactive (supporting) battery components.

Tuesday
Potential roles of graphene composites and metamaterials in human space exploration
10:45am - 11:00am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: A311-A312
Dr. Thomas M Orlando, Ph.D., Presenter, Georgia Institute of Technology
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Human exploration of the Moon requires strong light-weight materials with exceptionally high thermal and electrical conductivities. Polymer composites utilizing reduced graphite/graphene-oxide rGO have been developed as potential space-suit laminates. These coatings have 10 ohm per square sheet resistances; sufficient to provide static discharge paths for dust mitigation. The graphene field-effect transistor platform has also been used to develop radiation-sensitive metamaterials. Using CVD graphene transfer, electron beam lithography, and various fabrication methods, two neutron-series prototypes detectors have been developed. Ultimately, these will be integrated into space-suit material and interfaced with helmet displays for real time active dosimetry during extravehicular activity.

Tuesday
Electrochemical capture and conversion of carbon dioxide into all carbon nanostructures
11:00am - 11:15am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: A311-A312
Dr. Anna Douglas, PhD, Presenter, SkyNano
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Despite over 37,000,000,000 metric tons of CO2 being released into the atmosphere each year, the cost and practicality of carbon capture and conversion hinges on the ability to produce products from CO2 that have a market value greater than the cost of production (including the cost of both carbon capture and conversion). To date, there are very few, if any, economic cases that can be made for existing technologies without assumptions of generous free electricity or significant carbon tax credits. SkyNano has developed a technology that relies on the electrochemical capture and conversion of CO2 into all-carbon nanomaterials mediated by molten carbonate salts.

Tuesday
Materials innovation for now and tomorrow at DuPont
11:15am - 11:30am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: A311-A312
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
DuPont materials have long been at the forefront of the world’s most significant technology challenges. New applications require materials that provide reliable and sustainable solutions for the most demanding applications. These range from materials robust enough for the rigors of space exploration, to those required to enable sub-5 nm circuits, 5G communications, and autonomous vehicles. This talk will summarize some of the key innovation challenges at the leading edge of these and other applications, with an emphasis on reliability and sustainability as key components of product design, enabled by chemistry, to ensure our planet and people continue to thrive.
Flexible Circuits and polyimide materials in Mars 2020 Rover

Flexible Circuits and polyimide materials in Mars 2020 Rover


Tuesday
Panel Discussion
11:30am - 12:30pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: A311-A312
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid

Fourth CME NASA Symposium: Chemistry for Resilient Human Space Exploration: Keynote and CME Nobel Laureate Lectures
02:00pm - 04:00pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 50
Dr. Michael A Meador, Organizer, Meador Aerospace Materials Group, LLC; Prof Robert Nolan, Organizer, Presider, The City University of New York; George Rodriguez, Organizer; Ksenia Takhistova, Organizer, CME; George Rodriguez, Presider; Ksenia Takhistova, Presider, CME; Prof Robert Nolan, Presider, The City University of New York; Dr. James L. Green, Presider
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Division/Committee: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Tuesday
Shaping a new era of space exploration with perseverance, ingenuity, and resiliency
02:00pm - 02:25pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 50
Dr. James L. Green, Presenter
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
People all over the world were elated by the success of humanity's most daring mission to the Red Planet to date: the landing of the Perseverance rover and the Ingenuity helicopter. Ingenuity is the first ariel vehicle to conduct remote and autonomous research and exploration starting at a distance of over 60 million km from Earth. Find out the extraordinary initial research results on the search for life on Mars and what is next at NASA for industry partnering and find out how you may help in supporting human exploration beyond low Earth orbit.

Tuesday
Withdrawn
02:25pm - 02:45pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 50
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual

Tuesday
Formulating climate change solutions under deep uncertainty
02:45pm - 03:00pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 50
Judith Curry, Presenter
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
World leaders have made a forceful statement that climate change is the greatest challenge facing humanity in the 21st century. However, there is a wide gap between ambition and implementation of policies to address climate change. Oversimplification of the climate change problem and its solution have resulted in a political stalemate. Understanding the many dimensions of uncertainty surrounding the climate change problem helps us to better assess the risks. A framework is presented for a 'Plan B' to strategize on how we can formulate pragmatic solutions for responding to climate change while improving human well-being.

Tuesday
Creating localized carbon reduction strategies
03:00pm - 03:15pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 50
Dr. Marilyn Brown, Regents Professor, Presenter, Georgia Tech
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Localized carbon-reduction strategies are especially critical in states and regions that lack top-down climate leadership. This paper illustrates the use of coupled systems in assessing subnational climate solutions with a case study of the state of Georgia. The paper illustrates how robust place-specific plans for climate action can be derived from foundational global and national work and by embedding that research into the context of socio-ecological-technological systems. Our replicable methodology advances the traditional additive sectoral wedge analysis of carbon abatement potential by incorporating solution interdependencies and by spanning both carbon sources and sinks. The solutions are affiliated with an array of social co-costs and co-benefits that highlight societal concerns extending beyond climate impacts, including public health, environmental quality, employment, and equity.

Tuesday
Panel: Creating resilient approaches to climate change
03:15pm - 03:50pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 50
George Rodriguez, Presenter, Argeni; Judith Curry, Presenter; Marilyn Brown, Presenter
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Climate change has become one of the most prominent topics of this century. Two notable figures in the field of sustainable systems and climatology will share their insights on how the central theme of this ACS national meeting--resiliency of science--calls for a practical multidisciplinary and systemic approach to develop resilient frameworks for the most efficient use of resources to deal effectively with the colossal challenges of global climate. This is a unique opportunity to join the conversation about the latest information on the technologies, systems, social impact and the future of climate change by interacting directly with two renowned thought leaders.

Tuesday
CME lectures and awards introduction
03:50pm - 04:00pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 50
George Rodriguez, Presenter, Argeni
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
This exciting session will feature Nobel Laureates Ben Feringa (U. Groningen) and Robert Grubbs (Caltech) and two eminent figures in climate change, Judith Curry, and system sustainability, Marilyn Brown. In 2019 this session included Nobel Laureates Frances Arnold and Eric Betzig.

Fourth CME NASA Symposium: Chemistry for Resilient Human Space Exploration: CME Nobel Laureate Lecture
04:30pm - 06:00pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 42
Dr. Michael A Meador, Organizer, Meador Aerospace Materials Group, LLC; Prof Robert Nolan, Organizer, The City University of New York; George Rodriguez, Organizer; Ksenia Takhistova, Organizer, Presider, CME; George Rodriguez, Presider; Ksenia Takhistova, Presider, CME; Prof Robert Nolan, Presider, The City University of New York; Dr. James L. Green, Presider
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Division/Committee: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Tuesday
Withdrawn
04:30pm - 05:00pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 42
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual

Tuesday
Exploring catalytic space
05:00pm - 05:30pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 42
Ben L Feringa, Presenter, University of Groningen
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Transition metal catalysts continue to be at the frontier in the search for novel reactivity and synthetic methodology. Controlling chemo- and stereo-selectivity and low E-factor methods offer major challenges while novel approaches toward dynamic functions controlled by catalysis. In this lecture various approaches to address these challenges will be discussed. Specific topics are Murahashi-Feringa cross coupling with organolithium reagents, sustainable low-E-factor transformations and adaptive chiral catalysts. In addition, a green route to novel industrial coatings using photocatalytic oxidation as a key transformation will be presented.

Tuesday
4th CME NASA symposium: Summary, reception instructions, adjournment
05:30pm - 06:00pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 42
Dr. James L. Green, Presenter; Ksenia Takhistova, Presenter, CME; George Rodriguez, Presenter, Argeni
Division: [POLY] Division of Polymer Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Concluding Remarks; Reception Instructions and Plans for 2022 Fifth CME NASA Symposium in Chicago.

Solid-State Inorganic Chemistry:
04:30pm - 06:10pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 26, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 17
Claus Lugmair, Organizer, Clariant Corp; Viktor V Poltavets, Ph.D., Organizer, Michigan State University; Viktor V Poltavets, Ph.D., Presider, Michigan State University
Division: [INOR] Division of Inorganic Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Division/Committee: [INOR] Division of Inorganic Chemistry
Thursday
Bimetallic trifluoroacetates as precursors to layered perovskites A2MnF4 (A = K, Rb, Cs): Synthesis, structure, and reactivity
04:30pm - 04:50pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 26, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 17
Division: [INOR] Division of Inorganic Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Alkali−manganese layered fluoroperovskites A2MnF4 (A = K, Rb, Cs) are an important class of functional materials. Despite the improvements achieved in growing high-quality single crystals of this family of materials, only a handful of studies report the synthesis of polycrystalline A2MnF4. The majority of these reports rely on high-temperature solid-state reactions (>650 °C) and yield impure and/or poorly characterized products. As an example, the crystal structure of Cs2MnF4 is not reported in the literature or any crystallographic database. The lack of detailed studies aimed at preparing chemically pure A2MnF4 motivated us to explore a new synthetic approach to this family of materials. Bimetallic trifluoroacetates of formulas K4Mn2(tfa)8, Rb4Mn2(tfa)8.0.23H2O, and Cs3Mn2(tfa)7(tfaH) (tfa = CF3COO–, tfaH = CF3COOH) were used as self-fluorinating, single-source precursors to the corresponding layered fluoroperovskites. Trifluoroacetates were synthesized in single crystal and polycrystalline forms. Solid-state decomposition of K4Mn2(tfa)8 and Rb4Mn2(tfa)8.0.23H2O yielded single-phase K2MnF4 and Rb2MnF4, respectively, whereas Cs3Mn2(tfa)7(tfaH) decomposed to a mixture of Cs2MnF4 and CsMnF3. Crystallization of the mixed-metal fluorides occured at temperatures between 200 and 300 °C. Based on Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffraction data, we propose that the crystal structure of Cs2MnF4 is isomorphous to K2MnF4 and Rb2MnF4. Our work highlights the feasibility of using bimetallic trifluoroacetates as precursors to layered A2MnF4, for which a limited number of synthetic routes is available in the literature.
Thursday
Electrical charge transport property and electrocatalytic activity of layered oxides
04:50pm - 05:10pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 26, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 17
MD. SOFIUL ALOM, Presenter, University of Louisville; Farshid Ramezanipour, Presenter
Division: [INOR] Division of Inorganic Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Materials that are able to catalyze both half reactions of water splitting, i.e., oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) are highly sought after. Bifunctional electrocatalytic activity for water-splitting in layered oxides is reported in this work. A series of layered oxides, with general formula AA’BO4-δ, featuring a range of compositions with different ratios of Fe and Co on the B-site and Sr/La on the A/A’-sites have been synthesized. They contain 2-dimensional layers of octahedrally coordinated transition metals separated by alkaline earth or rare earth metals. Remarkably, these materials are able to catalyze both half-reactions of water-splitting, i.e., oxygen-evolution reaction (OER) and hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER). The electrical charge transport properties and electrocatalytic activities are methodically enhanced by changing the ratios of transition metals on the B-site. The most active catalyst in the series features the highest degree of polyhedral distortion, highest conductivity and the presence of oxygen deficiency. These factors, combined with a favorable electronic configuration, result in enhanced electrocatalytic properties.
Thursday
Energy-dense propagation controlled pyrolants for future space missions
05:10pm - 05:30pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 26, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 17
Ms. Katerina Chagoya, MS, University of Central Florida; Raghu Kancherla; Anthony Terracciano; Subith Vasu; Richard Blair, Presenter, Univ. Central Florida, Florida Space Institute
Division: [INOR] Division of Inorganic Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Energy sources powering space missions range from highly energetic nuclear reactions to short-lifetime and low-output batteries. The proper selection of a power system is dependent on the mission duration and destination and oftentimes energy sources that may be optimal for the former may be unsuitable for the latter. Various limitations of these power sources hinder the capacity for regular and frequent space exploration. However, the ability to harvest heat for electrical power generation would allow for long-distance and long-duration missons at a reduced cost. By employing a regulated, slow-propagating, exothermic chemical reaction between solid, harvestable heat and ,ission useful products can be realized. Twenty energy-dense compositions were selected to assess for their energy content, propgation rate, and potentially useful products. A graphite propagation cell was developed to measure reaction rates and temperatures during linear propagation. Each reaction is initiated through DC resistive heating of a nichrome wire. Thermocouples were placed at 1 cm intervals along the length of reaction’s propagation path. A multi-step experimental process was devised to evaluate each reaction. By this process, reactions were organized into groups according to their usefullness in harvesting heat, ease of ignition, as well as propagation speed. These mixtures will be incorpoated in to a heat havesting device for power and heat uses in short term missions where solar and nuclear power are impractical or not cost effective.

Thursday
Clathrate XI and other compounds in K-Zn-Sb ternary system unlocked by hydride route
05:30pm - 05:50pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 26, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 17
Division: [INOR] Division of Inorganic Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Discovery of new compounds? is paramount in solid state and materials chemistry. Oftentimes, synthesis of such new compounds is contingent upon tedious optimizations. Application of theory and algorithms to predict possible crystal structures have aided in the discovery process however, complex crystal structures with large unit cells are still out of reach. Rapid compositional space scanning of K-Zn-Sb system performed using the hydride route resulted in the discovery of K8-xZn18+3xSb16. Subsequent reactions in the same system guided by machine learning led to the synthesis of the novel clathrate XI K58Zn122Sb207.
The initial discovery of K8-xZn18+3xSb16 in the K-Zn-Sb was due to rapid screening of the ternary phase space using the hydride synthesis method. This allowed multiple reactions to be carried out in a short period of time and thus locate the region of existence of the target phase. This K8-xZn18+3xSb16 (P42/nmc) structure features a 3D Zn-Sb framework forming large channels inside which K cations reside. Throughout the optimization of synthesis of this initial phase, another unknown phase appeared. Using heats of formation calculated using machine learning algorithms and in-situ X-ray diffraction, the ideal reaction composition and synthetic conditions were derived allowing to establish the complex crystal structure of new clathrate XI: K58Zn122Sb207. This crystal structure features [Zn-Sb] frameworks with four types of cages, each containing K cations. The K cation is free to rattle within these cages which results in an extraordinarily low thermal conductivity. Two types of the cages have been observed in other clathrate structures however two new cage types were found in the structure of K58Zn122Sb207. The crystal structure solution was performed as a 6-component twin due to the pseudocubic symmetry and racemic twinning in the I-42m space group. High resolution synchrotron powder diffraction as well as state-of-the-art scanning transmission electron microscopy further confirmed this unique structure.

Thursday
Beyond trigonal and tetrahedral borate moieties: The elusive linear BO2 anion
05:50pm - 06:10pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 26, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 17
Dr. Kent J. Griffith, Presenter, Northwestern University; Fenghua Ding; Kenneth Poeppelmeier
Division: [INOR] Division of Inorganic Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Over 3900 crystalline borate materials are known in addition to a plethora of borate glasses. All but a small handful of these compounds are proposed to comprise only trigonal planar BO3 and tetrahedral BO4. However, the presence of linear BO2 has been proposed in the apatite structure A10(PO4)6–xy(SiO4)x(BO4)y(BO2) featuring site disorder and in a twinned crystal of Gd4(BO2)O5F.

Herein, we investigate a newly discovered ordered borate with composition K5Ba2(B10O17)2(BO2) featuring all three boron bonding environments. We employ an NMR crystallography approach with single-crystal diffraction in combination with solid-state NMR as a probe of local structure. DFT calculations and numerical simulations of the NMR spectral features are undertaken to complement the experimental methods. Owing to its anisotropic geometry, quadrupolar and dipolar interactions dominate the 11B and (17O) NMR lineshape of linear BO2. Furthermore, the linear BO2 unit does not follow the expected 11B chemical shift trend; an explanation is proposed on the basis of differences in bonding. Through experiment and modeling of a variety of solid-state NMR conditions (B0 field, magic-angle spinning rate), the optimal conditions are determined for the identification of BO2, which is especially important when it is present as a minor component as is the case here (BO2 accounts for just 1 of 21 boron atoms in the asymmetric unit). There are indications of enhanced vibrational and/or rotational dynamics of BO2 relative to BO3 and BO4.

The results from ordered K5Ba2(B10O17)2(BO2) are generalized to other potential BO2-containing structures via experiment and theory. Furthermore, we hope the characteristic solid-state NMR signatures of linear BO2 identified here will serve as a guide for the study of glasses and disordered materials where BO2 could be present as a unique building block but cannot be identified without local structural characterization tools such as NMR and appropriate model reference systems.