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Division/Committee: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals

Natural products and biologicals as sources of new sustainable crop protection solutions and predictive computational tools being leveraged to predict safety and sustainability attributes in the development of crop protection products.

Sunday
Introductory Remarks
10:30am - 10:35am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 37
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual

Sunday
Embedding sustainability in crop protection discovery, development and manufacturing
10:35am - 11:25am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 37
Dr Ashish Batra, Presenter, Corteva Agriscience
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
We will describe differentiating criteria, metrics and areas of focus of sustainability that are being used at various stages in the discovery of new active ingredients; process development of these active ingredients & formulation and packaging of new sustainable crop protection products. Manufacturing and post launch process improvements of active ingredients with a focus on sustainability will also be described. This paradigm shift of embedding sustainable attributes end to end from discovery through manufacturing will be illustrated with numerous examples and case studies.
Sunday
Synthesis and biological activity of 6-arylpicolinate herbicides with 2,3,4-trisubstituted aryl tails
11:25am - 11:50am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 37
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
The 6-arylpicolinates, also known as 6-APs, are an important class of herbicides with activity against a variety of broadleaf, sedge, and grass weeds. Research efforts in this area led to the discovery of ArylexTM active and RinskorTM active, two recently launched herbicides in the cereals and rice markets, respectively. The extent and nature of substitution on the 6-aryl group, typically referred to as the aryl tail, has a profound effect on herbicidal activity. Aryl tails with a fluorine atom at the 2-position, a methoxy group at the 3-position, and a chlorine atom at the 4-position are associated with potent herbicidal activity. In order to identify other favorable substituents at the 3-position, a broad survey of functional groups was undertaken. The synthesis and biological activity of relevant molecules will be discussed.

Sunday
Withdrawn
11:50am - 12:15pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 37
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual

Sunday
Discussion
12:15pm - 12:25pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 37
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual

Sunday
Concluding Remarks
12:25pm - 12:30pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 37
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual

Process Research & Development in Crop Protection:
10:30am - 12:30pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 44
Dr. Helmars Smits, Organizer, Syngenta Crop Protection AG; Suelen Vasquez Cespedes, Organizer, Corteva Inc Indianapolis; Chao Wang, Organizer, BASF; Suelen Vasquez Cespedes, Presider, Corteva Inc Indianapolis; Dr. Helmars Smits, Presider, Syngenta Crop Protection AG; Chao Wang, Presider, BASF
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Division/Committee: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals

This symposium serves as a platform for crop protection process scientists to share their innovative solutions to address the food security needs of the growing world population. Route design, development, and optimization of crop protection products will be discussed. The content will be beneficial to process chemists in other industries.

Sunday
Introductory Remarks
10:30am - 10:35am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 44
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual

Sunday
Reagents, ligands and catalysts: A three-fold approach for organic synthesis
10:35am - 11:25am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 44
Josep Cornella, Presenter
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
The main goal of our research group is to provide efficient, robust and sustainable methodologies for organic synthesis. To this end, our group has established a three-fold approach based on 1) the development of new organic reagents that enable practical and facile organic chemistry by streamlining synthetic routes; 2) the design of ligands that enable the development of air-sensitive transition metal complexes with remarkable stability toward oxidation and temperature, thus broadening the applicability of methodologies restricted to the use of Schlenk or gloveboxes; 3) the design of p-block elements, in particular bismuth (Bi), that enable catalytic redox transformations akin to transition metals. We believe that this 3-fold approach is key to unlock new reactivity while allowing the discovery of fundamentally novel and unknown areas in chemistry. This talk will highlight the contributions of our group in these endeavors and will provide an overview of the recent developments.
Research Overview of the Cornella Group

Research Overview of the Cornella Group


Sunday
Searching for the holistic solution
11:25am - 11:50am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 44
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
An overview of some of the challenges met within the Process Research in the Crop Science Division at Bayer will be given. Chemistry from the first studies on early development projects through to the latest innovative crop protection products will be used to show how ‘elegance through simplicity’ can be achieved by understanding and exploiting the natural reactivity and selectivity of a reaction system. With modern crop protection products becoming ever more complex, it is ultimately this simplicity that underpins the demanding COGs of a modern product.
Sunday
Guide, predict and explain experiments probing ligands in catalysis with a platform of high-level descriptors of phosphorus ligands
11:50am - 12:15pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 44
Tobias Gensch, Presenter
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Finding optimal ligands is often essential for a selective and high-yielding catalytic reaction. This search is difficult due to the subtle ligand effects and the discrete nature of ligand molecules that precludes a direct application in data-driven, numerical optimization. We have developed a data base of high-level physicochemical descriptors of ca. 1500 organophosphorus ligands that can be used to design, guide and interpret experiments that probe the ligand effect in catalytic reactions. The data base includes a workflow that captures the conformational flexibility of ligands and a wide range of ligand properties. These properties contribute to mechanistically interpretable models of experimentally observed ligand performance, as well as suggestions of ligands with improved performance. The chemical space of phosphorus ligands that is defined by this descriptor set can be used to design entire ligand sets for reaction optimization and to analyze similarities between ligand types. We have furthermore demonstrated the use of a machine learning model ensemble to estimate the descriptors of ca. 300 000 ligands for virtual screening using simple features such as fingerprints or molecular graphs.
Sunday
Panel Discussion
12:15pm - 12:25pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 44
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual

Sunday
Concluding Remarks
12:25pm - 12:30pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 44
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual

Division/Committee: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals

Natural products and biologicals as sources of new sustainable crop protection solutions and predictive computational tools being leveraged to predict safety and sustainability attributes in the development of crop protection products.

Sunday
Introductory Remarks
02:00pm - 02:05pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 40
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual

Sunday
Scaling multi-omics to uncover microbial natural products for enhanced sustainability
02:05pm - 02:55pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 40
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Bacteria and fungi offer many new compounds yet to be discovered and exploited as leads in crop protection and drug discovery campaigns. The genomics era has ushered in a wealth of information about the natural product biosynthetic arsenals of both, promising vast new collections of fine chemicals. However, tools to convert that genomic knowledge into the promised wealth of new molecules have only recently produced “big data” and begun to emerge. Leveraging genome sequencing and mass spectrometry-based metabolomics with accurate mass, new and scalable approaches to identification of natural products and their biosynthetic gene clusters have been developed. One of the first was the technique of “metabologenomics” (reported in 2014) and led to discovery of dozens of new compounds like tambromycin, which harbors a new amino acid and antiproliferative activity (ACS Central Sci. 2016, 2(2):99-108.). This platform for “high-throughput discovery” of natural products also identify the biosynthetic gene clusters that encode their production, giving major insights into biosynthesis, structure, mode of action and provide actionable information to overexpress “Nature’s drugs” to high titers. The talk will also describe an interpreted atlas of >35k gene clusters derived from >1000 fungal genomes (PNAS USA, 2021, in press). Combined with new tools and data clouds, this field is poised to deliver renewable, reliable sources for the discovery of new natural products. We are well en route to regularize and domesticate large swaths of the bacterial and fungal natural products for exploitation in the public and private sectors in the dawning era of “high- throughput” natural products discovery.
Sunday
Phytochemicals in air and monoterpenes as biopesticides
02:55pm - 03:20pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 40
Qing Li, Presenter, Univ of Hawaii; Magaret Baker; James Seiber
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Walking through a rose garden is pleasant and joyful due to our sensitive noses sensing the essential oil components such as monoterpenes emitted from roses. There are an astonishing number of volatile organic compounds, primarily monoterpenes in the air, emitted from plants. Monoterpenes are the fragrant components of the essential oils. Essential oils have been used for a wide range of applications such as cooking spices, aromatherapy, perfumery, medicinal therapies, pesticides and food preservatives. Citronella oil obtained from the plants Cymbopogon (lemongrass) is used topically on people to control mosquitoes and other pests of medical importance. Basil (Ocimum basilicum) is a popular culinary herb. Basil oil has shown to be a potent biopesticide and food preservative. Basil oil contains more than 200 chemicals. Carvacrol, linalool and pulegone in basil oil showed excellent potency against thrips, melon fly, as well as turnip aphids. Basil oil, and its major components trans-anethole, estragole, and linalool are very potent against adult fruit flies of Ceratitis capitata, Bactrocera dorsalis, and Bactrocera cucurbitae. Electrophysiological studies indicated that linalool inhibits both mammalian γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptor (GABAAR) and nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), which may explain its insecticidal activity. Linalool is a concentration-dependent, non-competitive inhibitor on the GABAAR. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of linalool on the GABAAR and nAChR was approximately 3.2 mM and 3.0 mM, respectively. In this talk, we will also have a summary with new perspectives of the book recently published “Pesticides Organic Contaminants and Pathogens in Air: Chemodynamics, Health Effects and Analysis.” This book describes the use of terpenes among the many natural products as biopesticides and now accepted for organic food production. The monoterpene camphene is chlorinated to produce toxaphene. Toxaphene contains over 700 individual congeners, only a few of which are potent insecticides. There are sure to be terpenes and terpene blends yet to be developed that can play roles in pest control in the future.
Sunday
Efficient insecticides based on essential oils and clay
03:20pm - 03:45pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 40
Prof. Giora Rytwo, Presenter, Tel Hai College/MIGAL Research Institute; Tamir Kramer; Lotem Azoulay; Liora Shaltiel-Harpaz
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Due to pest's ability to develop resistance to pesticides, and reinforcement of environmental regulations, there is a need to develop novel pesticides, based on less hazardous compounds. Certain natural essential oils are known for their ability to be lethal to specific pests, and may therefore serve as an environmentally oriented alternative to traditional pesticides. However a key problem to be solved is the rapid volatility of such oils. Clays, organoclays and nanocomposites were suggested as matrices for adsorbing organic compounds leading to their controlled- or slower-release. Thus, such matrices might increase the pesticide efficiency of essential oils by slowly releasing them, offering an effective environmentally-oriented pesticide. This study combines in vitro studies evaluating the rate of evaporation of lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus) and rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) essential oils from clay based formulations, with in vivo experiments testing efficient doses of clay-essential oil insecticides on onion thrips (Thrips tabaci Lind ), without causing damage to chives crop (Allium Schoenoprasum) plants. For the in vivo experiments sepiolite clay was chosen, based on preliminary tests and following the assumption that a “simpler” matrix should be preferred. Kinetic measurements of evaporation led to the conclusion that binding to sepiolite increases the half-life evaporation period when compared to the free essential oils or oils pre-adsorbed to other clays. Headspace measurements of vapors in equilibrium with formulations demonstrate the influence of the interaction with the clay-matrix. Laboratory and semi-field trials showed significant essential oil lethality affected the Thrips for both lemon grass- and rosemary oil –sepiolite new formulations when compared to control, with less damage to the crop. This study provides an environmentally oriented approach that might yield effective pesticides based on natural and less hazardous compounds.
Percentage of Thrips survival (a) and leaves damaged (b) at various doses of lemon weed (CCEO) or rosemary (ROEO) essential oils alone, or pre-adsorbed to sepiolite clay (SEP). Letters indicate Tukey HSD significant differences at p<0.05

Percentage of Thrips survival (a) and leaves damaged (b) at various doses of lemon weed (CCEO) or rosemary (ROEO) essential oils alone, or pre-adsorbed to sepiolite clay (SEP). Letters indicate Tukey HSD significant differences at p<0.05


Sunday
Discussion
03:45pm - 03:55pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 40
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual

Sunday
Concluding Remarks
03:55pm - 04:00pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 40
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual

Process Research & Development in Crop Protection:
02:00pm - 04:00pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 48
Dr. Helmars Smits, Organizer, Syngenta Crop Protection AG; Suelen Vasquez Cespedes, Organizer, Corteva Inc Indianapolis; Chao Wang, Organizer, BASF; Suelen Vasquez Cespedes, Presider, Corteva Inc Indianapolis; Dr. Helmars Smits, Presider, Syngenta Crop Protection AG; Chao Wang, Presider, BASF
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Division/Committee: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals

This symposium serves as a platform for crop protection process scientists to share their innovative solutions to address the food security needs of the growing world population. Route design, development, and optimization of crop protection products will be discussed. The content will be beneficial to process chemists in other industries.

Sunday
Introductory Remarks
02:00pm - 02:05pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 48
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual

Sunday
Radical deoxyfunctionalisation strategies
02:05pm - 02:45pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 48
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Due to their abundance and readily available synthesis, alcohols provide ideal handles for the regio- and chemoselective derivatisation of organic molecules. Although performing deoxyfunctionalisation reactions on primary or secondary alcohols can be readily achieved using classical nucleophilic substitution chemistry, it is highly challenging to perform these transformations with tertiary or sterically hindered secondary and primary alcohols. Therefore, it is important to design general synthetic strategies that can address this issue. Radical chemistry can help to overcome the steric and electronic limitations associated with SN2 and SN1 reactions and unlock the development of general deoxyfunctionalisation strategies on tertiary alcohols. Our work in this area began with the development of a light-mediated, catalyst-free radical deoxyfluorination strategy, allowing the selective late-stage incorporation of fluorine atoms – which can dramatically affect the stability, bioactivity and lipophilicity of organic molecules –from tertiary alcohols. Preliminary results show that it is possible to extend this radical deoxyfunctionalisation concept to synthesise tertiary nitriles and azides, accessing novel structures and, critically, providing handles for bioconjugation. This approach not only establishes novel reactivity, but obviates hazardous alternative reagents, such as DAST, metal cyanides or potentially explosive azide sources, for the introduction of these functional groups. In addition, we have recently developed a straightforward methodology to access a new class of bicyclic scaffold through an intramolecular Minisci-type process. These structural motifs offer ample opportunities for further derivatisation, allowing for the rapid increase of molecular complexity.

Sunday
Route scouting and development of scalable routes towards insecticidal and fungicidal development candidates
02:45pm - 03:05pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 48
Dr. Helmars Smits, Presenter, Syngenta Crop Protection AG; Sujit Ghorai; Anup Jawalekar
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
During the early stages of the project the synthesis of agrochemically active substances is focused on fast delivery of the required material as well as for diversity of scaffolds accessible by the same route. Once a single development candidate has been identified the focus has to shift to scalability, ease of synthesis and ultimate cost of the process. This necessitates novel approaches to complex synthetic problems and careful evaluation of alternative synthetic options with eventual large-scale production in mind. Here we present two case studies on route scouting and evaluation for the synthesis of agrochemically active substances (1 and 2). In both cases the target substances were assembled in highly convergent manner and starting from materials available on a large scale.

Sunday
Route design of Adavelt™ active, a corteva fungicide
03:05pm - 03:25pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 48
Dr Megan Cismesia, Presenter, Corteva Agriscience
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Adavelt™ active is a novel fungicide currently in development by Corteva Agriscience. A fully synthetic neopicolinamide fungicide, Adavelt has favorable regulatory, toxicological and environmental profiles. This talk will discuss the research and development into the synthetic route of Adavelt. The synthesis embodies many of the 12 Principles of Green Chemistry, including using renewable feedstocks and less hazardous chemical reagents.
® Trademarks of Corteva Agriscience and its affiliated companies

Sunday
Application of a semi-automated crystallizer to study oiling-out and agglomeration events—A case study in industrial crystallization optimization
03:25pm - 03:45pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 48
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
A case study on a challenging industrial crystallization is presented. The crystallization under investigation was prone to oiling-out, which led to agglomeration and crystallization stalling. A semi-automated crystallizer—designed and built iteratively as the crystallization needs changed—was used to study the crystallization and identify the failure modes. Turbidity, in situ video microscopy images (Mettler Toledo EasyViewer) and mother liquor information (automated sampler combined with offline HPLC) were collected during crystallization. Turbidity was monitored to detect the agglomeration event caused by oiling-out and was subsequently used as a feedback mechanism to change the temperature profile to reverse oiling-out and resume crystal growth. The automated sampler, coupled with off-line HPLC analysis, provided valuable insight about the behavior of impurities during oiling-out and identified a specific impurity that influenced the formation of the second liquid phase and crystallization rate. The data-rich experimentation allowed for the expedient optimization of crystallization parameters, such as temperature profile, seed loading and cycle time. The final crystallization was robust, predictable, and capable of self-correction, should a potential failure mode be encountered.

Sunday
Panel Discussion
03:45pm - 03:55pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 48
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual

Sunday
Concluding Remarks
03:55pm - 04:00pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 48
Division: [AGRO] Division of Agrochemicals
Session Type: Oral - Virtual

New Frontiers and Opportunities for Chemistry: Materials
02:00pm - 04:00pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 45
Dr. H.N. Cheng, Organizer, Presider, USDA Agricultural Res. Service; Young-Shin Jun, Organizer, Presider, Washington University in St. Louis; Martin Kociolek, Organizer, Presider, Penn State Erie, The Behrend College; Michael Morello, Organizer, Presider, Retired: PepsiCo R&D
Division: [COMSCI] Committee on Science
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Division/Committee: [COMSCI] Committee on Science

Chemistry is becoming increasingly multidisciplinary, and the future chemists and chemical engineers may find increasing opportunities to apply their chemical knowledge in new or expanded areas. Certainly, the skills and the tools of chemistry are positively needed to solve the grand challenges of today, such as diseases, climate change, energy, clean air and water, food, population, and sustainability. This colloquium will highlight some of the important growth areas, showing the prospects and opportunities for chemistry in the future. This symposium will also show how being adaptable, collaborative, and entrepreneurial will help chemists and chemical engineers succeed in the future.

Sunday
Getting in front of the additive manufacturing revolution: Sustainability needs and opportunities
02:00pm - 02:30pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 45
Joseph DeSimone, Presenter, Stanford University
Division: [COMSCI] Committee on Science
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
In 21 Lessons for the 21st Century, Yuval Noah Harari makes the point that the unintended consequences of too many breakthrough technologies threaten our future: Facebook set out to bring people together but grew to foster divisiveness; Juul intended to end smoking but triggered addiction to vaping; encrypted messaging designed to protect privacy enabled an underworld to thrive. He argues that liberalism has no answers to the biggest problems we face: ecological collapse and technological disruption. The proliferation of plastics and the lack of chemical circularity is the posterchild for this perspective. Recent advances in additive manufacturing technologies demonstrate how the industry is poised to make the jump from a “prototyping only” $8 billion industry to replace injection molding techniques—a $330 billion industry. As the initial stages of this major technology transition come into focus, we are at a unique moment in time to put polymer additive manufacturing on a sustainable trajectory. This talk will describe needs and opportunities for recyclable and upcyclable polymers in the context of this major transition, ultimately toward achieving a circular economy.
Sunday
Placing 3D bioprinting in the context of tissue fabrication
02:30pm - 03:00pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 45
Prof. Y Shrike Zhang, Presenter, Harvard Medical School
Division: [COMSCI] Committee on Science
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
Three-dimensional (3D) printing refers to the fabrication of constructs from a digital 3D model in a layer-wise or volumetric programmed manner. The flexibility, versatility, and functionality of 3D printing enable the fabrication of exquisite and intricate structures with maneuverable resolutions across multiple length scales. One major sub-category of 3D printing is 3D bioprinting, in which a combination of cells, growth factors, and biomaterials (i.e., bioink) may be used as the printing material for additive manufacturing of biological constructs. As an evolving field of biofabrication, 3D bioprinting is being explored for myriad applications including tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, patient-specific grafts, as well as tissue model engineering and personalizable drug screening, among others. Depending on the applications and the bioinks’ physicochemical properties, various technologies including nozzle-based and light-based are being developed for 3D bioprinting. This talk will provide an overview of the various bioprinting strategies developed or optimized within our laboratory over the past few years, with a number of examples that specifically relate chemistry to the improvement of bioprinting capacities also given.
Sunday
It’s about I: Invention, innovation, inspiration, and inclusivity
03:00pm - 03:30pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 45
Kathryn Uhrich, Presenter
Division: [COMSCI] Committee on Science
Session Type: Oral - Virtual
My research focuses on the design, synthesis and characterization of biocompatible, biodegradable polymers that serve a critical need in therapeutics/drug delivery. My most well-known invention is “PolyAspirin”; it was the first example of a polymer that degrades into a bioactive such as salicylic acid (SA) that can locally reduce inflammation and pain. These polymers were evaluated for various wound healing applications, such as promoting bone regeneration in diabetic animals. Another invention is the amphiphilic macromolecules (AMs), which are also bioactive. The bioactive AMs were unique therapeutic coatings for metal cardiac stents to reduce smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation and platelet adhesion in humans. To date, this research has produced more than 190 peer-reviewed papers and generated nearly $30 million in federal and corporate research funding. In entrepreneurship and technology transfer, I’m an inventor on more than 70 U.S. and international issued patents based upon research performed in my research labs. I’ve also been involved in multiple start-up companies centered on biomedical polymers and worked in close partnership with companies, such as BASF, Chanel, Colgate-Palmolive, DuPont, ExxonMobil, and L’Oréal. The partnerships are typically to develop new materials and/or products that are nontoxic and biodegradable that meet an unmet consumer need in pharmaceutics, medical devices, personal care, and environmental applications. Encouraging curiosity, brainstorming, preparing for failure, and promoting teamwork are keys to the success of my research labs.
Sunday
Materials opportunities in a post Moore era
03:30pm - 04:00pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: Zoom Room 45
Rudy Wojtecki, Ph.D., Presenter, IBM Research
Division: [COMSCI] Committee on Science
Session Type: Oral - Virtual

As computational tasks and the complexity of addressable problems become more difficult computing will dramatically change. The future of computing may then shift from traditional architectures to an increased dependence on alternatives – deep neural networks for artificial intelligence and superconducting circuits for quantum computing, to name a few. It is, however, also important to acknowledge that scaling continues leading to the further densification of computational components. There are materials opportunities in both arenas. Our research efforts have focused on developing specialized stimuli-responsive material sets around two broad topic areas: (i) materials for area selective depositions and (ii) responsive materials for electronic packaging.
(i) Current approaches to nanoscale fabrication largely rely on subtractive processes, which often alters the chemical composition of a surface (such as oxidation) or damage materials by amorphizing an otherwise crystalline thin film, from reactive ion etching, for insance. As miniaturization reaches single nanometer regimes, surfaces and interfaces become dominant. The ability to add a film to a surface in a selected area allows one to grow components of a device without damage to surfaces or interfaces. With the use of specialized inhibiting chemistries area selective depositions can be achieved, with reduced defectivity as well as offering multiple capabilities such as self-aligning patternable monolayers that can be employed in an example of additive lithography.
(ii) As the packaging space is challenged to join an increasing number of separately manufactured components into integrated device the packaging materials requirements become more demanding. These materials sets make use of irreversible chemistries in curing and crosslinking that tend to reduce throughput and yield as errors or defects in processing cannot be addressed after processing. The ability to redesign these materials to introduce moieties that can be controllably broken and reformed offers the potential to access highly desirable materials characteristics in the packaging space such as reworkability and rehealability.