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The Kavli Foundation Emerging Leader in Chemistry Keynote Lecture:
12:30pm - 01:30pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 23, 2021 | Room: Sidney Marcus Auditorium
Division: [MPPG] Multidisciplinary Program Planning Group
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Co-sponsor/Theme: Theme: Resilience of Chemistry

Division/Committee: [MPPG] Multidisciplinary Program Planning Group


Monday
Introductory Remarks
12:30pm - 12:35pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 23, 2021 | Room: Sidney Marcus Auditorium
Division: [MPPG] Multidisciplinary Program Planning Group
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid

Monday
Chemistry of DNA damage and measuring genomic resilience
12:35pm - 01:25pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 23, 2021 | Room: Sidney Marcus Auditorium
Division: [MPPG] Multidisciplinary Program Planning Group
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
All physiological processes tied to cellular replication rely on the chemical integrity of DNA. As such, DNA damage is associated with a range of adverse outcomes such as accelerated aging and cancer, and is the underlying bases of most frontline cancer therapies. However, measuring DNA damage is an analytical challenge due to the low abundance of these events and our inability to specifically amplify DNA damage without losing the chemical information. In this presentation, I will discuss how we apply an interdisciplinary approach, combining mass spectrometry, click chemistry, and biosensing to overcome these challenges to study the occurrence, patterns, and repair of DNA damage. Identifying the patterns of DNA damage, the chemical basis of repair, and how these processes may be modulated, supports our understanding of mechanisms of carcinogenesis and strategies for improving cancer therapeutics.
Monday
Question & Answer
01:25pm - 01:30pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 23, 2021 | Room: Sidney Marcus Auditorium
Division: [MPPG] Multidisciplinary Program Planning Group
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid

The Fred Kavli Innovations in Chemistry Keynote Lecture:
12:30pm - 01:30pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: Sidney Marcus Auditorium
Division: [MPPG] Multidisciplinary Program Planning Group
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Co-sponsor/Theme: Theme: Resilience of Chemistry

Division/Committee: [MPPG] Multidisciplinary Program Planning Group


Tuesday
Introductory Remarks
12:30pm - 12:35pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: Sidney Marcus Auditorium
Division: [MPPG] Multidisciplinary Program Planning Group
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid

Tuesday
Nanomaterials and Light for Sustainability and Societal Impact
12:35pm - 01:25pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: Sidney Marcus Auditorium
Professor Naomi Halas, Presenter, Rice University
Division: [MPPG] Multidisciplinary Program Planning Group
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Metallic nanoparticles, used since antiquity to impart intense, vibrant color into materials, then brought to scientific attention in the 19th century as “Faraday’s colloid”, have more recently become a central tool in the nanoscale manipulation of light. When excited by light, metallic nanoparticles undergo a coherent oscillation of their conduction electrons- known as a plasmon- which is responsible for their strong light-matter interactions and properties. While the scientific foundation of this field has been built on noble and coinage metals (most typically gold or silver), more recently we have begun to question whether the same, or similar properties can also be realized in more sustainable materials. Aluminum, the most abundant metal on our planet, can support high-quality plasmonic properties spanning the UV-to-IR region of the spectrum. Coupling a plasmonic nanoantenna directly to catalytic nanoparticles or individual single-atom catalytic sites transforms the entire complex into an efficient, light-controlled catalyst capable of driving chemical reactions under surprisingly mild, low temperature conditions. This new type of light-based catalyst can be utilized for remediating greenhouse gases, and converting them to useful molecules for industry, or benign molecules for a cleaner planet. We have previously introduced photothermal effects for biomedical therapeutics; now, years after their initial demonstration, this approach is being utilized in human trials for the precise and highly localized ablation of cancerous regions of the prostate, eliminating the highly deleterious side effects characteristic of conventional prostate cancer therapies. Photothermal effects can also be harvested for sustainability applications, which we have most recently demonstrated in an off-grid solar thermal desalination system that transforms membrane distillation into a scalable water purification process.
Tuesday
Question & Answer
01:25pm - 01:30pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 24, 2021 | Room: Sidney Marcus Auditorium
Division: [MPPG] Multidisciplinary Program Planning Group
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid