Technical Program Archive

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Saturday
ACS Kids Zone - A Presidential Outreach Event
11:00am - 02:00pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 21, 2021 | Room: Georgia Aquarium - Oceans Ballroom/Livestreamed on Facebook
Division: [PRES] Presidential Events
Session Type: Networking Events - In-person
Division/Committee: [PRES] Presidential Events

Chemists are catalysts for positive scientific and social change in communities everywhere! The ACS Committee on Community Activities and ACS President H. N. Cheng along with partners ACS Georgia Local Section, Spelman College Chemistry Club, and others are hosting a free hands-on science event in celebration of the theme, Chemists Catalyze Change. Tickets are sold out for the in-person event but don’t worry—you can join the livestream event on Facebook Live on Saturday, August 21 from 1 – 2 p.m. ACS science communicator Allison Tau will walk you through all aspects of the event, including a short interactive play at the chemistry theater called “Choose that Catalyst,” three engaging hands-on science activities, an interview with a scientist at the Meet a Chemist station, and information about how to advocate for chemistry. Learn more at www.acs.org/kidszone and watch the livestream on Facebook Live at www.facebook.com/AmericanChemicalSociety.

Saturday
COLL Programming Committee Meeting
04:00pm - 05:00pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 21, 2021 | Room: A705 - Atlanta Marriott Marquis
Division: [COLL] Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry
Session Type: Business Meeting - In-person
Division/Committee: [COLL] Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry
Saturday
COLL Executive Committee Meeting
05:00pm - 07:00pm USA / Canada - Eastern - August 21, 2021 | Room: A705 - Atlanta Marriott Marquis
Division: [COLL] Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry
Session Type: Business Meeting - In-person
Division/Committee: [COLL] Division of Colloid & Surface Chemistry
Remote & Virtual Learning for the Analytical Laboratory & Classroom:
08:00am - 10:00am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B308 - B309
Thomas Spudich, Organizer, Maryville University; Mark Vitha, Organizer, Drake Univ; Mark Vitha, Presider, Drake Univ
Division: [ANYL] Division of Analytical Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Co-sponsor/Theme: Theme: Resilience of Chemistry
Division/Committee: [ANYL] Division of Analytical Chemistry

This symposium will bring to light the variety of resources available for teaching analytical chemistry concepts and skills remotely, including experiments that students can do at home using specific chemicals found in everyday beverages and consumable food items and low-cost instrumentation and detection equipment. Other topics include using simulations to learn about analytical techniques such as HPLC, fluorescence, and chemical applications of microscopy. Presenters who have used these experiments and simulations will discuss their experiences, including what worked well and what educational opportunities remain in terms of teaching analytical chemistry concepts remotely.

Sunday
Online options for off-site learning in lower and upper-level analytical chemistry labs
08:00am - 08:30am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B308 - B309
Thomas Spudich, Presenter, Maryville University
Division: [ANYL] Division of Analytical Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
The development and implementation of remote labs has been essential for a variety of reasons. First, most of Higher Education had some modified form of lab in some format to include functioning off-campus at all course levels during the spring of 2020, fall of 2020 and spring of 2021 semesters. During the summer of 2020, a subset group of ASDLIB met to discuss and develop resources for labs that can be taught off-campus/at home for high school, general chemistry, quantitative analysis and instrumental analysis courses. The group constructed labs and simulations that include finding the pressure inside an unopened carbonated beverage, a penny statistics lab, creating and using a 3D printed photometer for quantitative determination of dyes, gravimetric acid-base titrations and an Excel-based HPLC simulator. Other resources highlighted here from others include a signal-to-noise ratio exercise using virtual instruments created using LabView, MICROLab titrations, and an interactive web application highlighting NMR Fourier transform calculations. All of these resources, to include some supplementary material from the authors, can be found at remotelabs.asdlib.org and are freely accessible under a Creative Commons license.
Sunday
Inexpensive, safe, and very accurate titrations for the home analytical chemistry laboratory
08:30am - 09:00am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B308 - B309
Peter Chen, Presenter, Spelman College
Division: [ANYL] Division of Analytical Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Titrations are one of the traditional techniques covered in analytical chemistry laboratories. For a home laboratory, the cost of purchasing traditional glassware needed to carry out titrations can be relatively high. Furthermore, the use of glass introduces a safety concern. This talk covers the use of plastic needle nose bottles, microbalances, and water bottles for carrying out titrations in the home laboratory. In addition to being safer and relatively inexpensive (less than $30), this approach can provide greater accuracy than the traditional approach because the size of the delivered drops are smaller and the resolution of a balance is higher than that of a buret. Titration labs may be further developed through the use of inexpensive pH meters that cost less than $10.
Sunday
Inquiry-based analytical chemistry laboratory experiments using paper microfluidic technology for distance or in-person learning
09:00am - 09:30am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B308 - B309
Kimberley Frederick, Presenter, Skidmore College; Dr. Marya Lieberman, University of Notre Dame; Renee Cole, University of Iowa; Andrea Van Wyck; Rachel M Roller, University of Notre Dame
Division: [ANYL] Division of Analytical Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Perhaps the greatest challenge for students learning remotely is how to engage in authentic laboratory experiences, including those that develop scientific practices. Paper microfluidics has the advantage of using microgram quantities of reagents and can be tailored to conduct many of the methods in a typical sophomore-level analytical course. Furthermore, this flexibility makes it possible for students to engage in inquiry-based lab experiments that develop skills such as planning and carrying out investigations, analyzing and interpreting data and constructing explanations and designing solutions. The MICRO project has developed nine laboratory experiments using paper microfluidics along with student and instructor support materials. We will present an overview of this work along with insights from early adopters on how participation in the MICRO community has impacted their student learning in both remote and in-person laboratory settings. We will also report the impact of participation on faculty instructional practices.
Sunday
Facilitating course-based undergraduate research experiences in a remote environment using paper microfluidic device design projects
09:30am - 10:00am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B308 - B309
Dr. Rebecca A. Hunter, Presenter, The College of New Jersey; Maury Howard; Kimberley Frederick, Skidmore College
Division: [ANYL] Division of Analytical Chemistry
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) are a mechanism for teaching students important skills such as experimental design and assessment of data. It is this experimental flexibility that also makes CUREs particularly challenging to adapt to a remote or socially distanced setting. Paper-based microfluidic devices provide a safe and versatile platform for experimentation and can be adapted for teaching and research at a variety of course levels and contexts. This paper microfluidics technology was recently used to create new CUREs in both quantitative and instrumental analysis courses at three primarily undergraduate institutions. As part of this authentic inquiry experience, students were able to design, assemble, and evaluate paper analytical devices for the quantitative analysis of a variety of analytes, allowing them to gain experience with key analytical chemistry skills as well as more general process skills such as problem solving and critical thinking.
US-Israeli Symposium on C1 Chemistry :
08:00am - 09:30am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B216 - B217
Aditya Bhan, Organizer, Univ of Minnesota; Oz M Gazit, Organizer, Technion; Prof. Dmitri Gelman, Organizer, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem; Daniel Resasco, Organizer, University of Oklahoma; Daniel Resasco, Presider, University of Oklahoma; Aditya Bhan, Presider, Univ of Minnesota
Division: [CATL] Division of Catalysis Science & Technology
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Division/Committee: [CATL] Division of Catalysis Science & Technology

This symposium explores the topic of C1 conversion in context of the broader chemical enterprise. Presentations will feature research at the state-of-the-art in electrochemical and thermochemical upgrading of C1 species to fuels and chemicals.

Sunday
Catalytic activation of light alkanes on promoted molybdenum oxide catalysts: Coupling of catalytic rates and their mechanistic implications
08:00am - 08:30am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B216 - B217
Division: [CATL] Division of Catalysis Science & Technology
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Catalytic conversions of light alkanes to their corresponding olefins are attractive routes for utilizing natural gas feedstocks. Starting with ethane, its reaction produces ethylene as the platform molecule for sequential synthesis of a wide variety of commodity chemicals, including polyethylene, styrene, ethylene oxide, and ethylene glycol. Its catalytic turnovers occur either without a co-oxidant via dehydrogenation or with O2 or CO2 via oxidative dehydrogenation reactions. Herein, we will unravel the mechanistic similarities and differences among the various ethane conversion reactions, on two-dimensional MoOx dispersed on Al2O3 catalysts promoted by Fe, Co, or Ni catalysts. These reactions, irrespective of the presence of or the chemical identity of the co-reactant, occur via the common step, that the initial C-H bond activation of ethane limits rates. The ethane activation cycle is catalytically coupled with the oxidant activation cycle, the latter generates reactive oxygen species that scavenge the surface carbon debris and therefore retain the catalytic reactivity and stability. We will discuss these catalytic cycles among the different ethane conversion catalysis, the key catalytic events, and their periodic reactivity trends, when incorporating the earth abundant Fe, Co, and Ni transition metal into the dispersed MoOx structures. More specifically, we will discuss how these metal cations could alter the catalytic rates of the various, concomitant catalytic cycles, interjecting deactivation, leading to the observed rates and selectivities. We attempt to provide consolidate mechanistic framework, accounting for both the rates as well as the time-dependent rate decay for ethane reactions for the series of catalyst materials.
Sunday
Multi-phase catalysts for stable methane cracking and reforming
08:30am - 09:00am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B216 - B217
Prof. Brian A. Rosen, Presenter, Tel Aviv University
Division: [CATL] Division of Catalysis Science & Technology
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
Defective solid-catalysts and multi-phase catalysts are intriguing materials which would pave the way towards stable methane cracking and reforming. While point defects have been well studied in energy conversion ceramics by exploiting non-isovalent lattice substitutions and non-stoichiometric compounds, the impact of multidimensional defects on catalytic activity and stability is far less studied. During activation, energy conversion catalysts often go through solid-state phase transitions. These transitions can either be beneficial or detrimental to performance. We observe that extended defects critically impacts the temperature at which such phase transitions can occur, the pathway of the phase transition, and resulting catalytic activity and stability of the catalyst. Extended defects such as stacking faults in substituted lanthanum nickelates and lanthanum ferrates can be exploited to significantly extend catalyst lifetimes and lower apparent activation energy for critical reactions such as methane and carbon monoxide oxidation. Furthermore, multi-phase catalysts involving solid-liquid equilibrium are also exploited to imbue stable methane cracking with increased performance.
Sunday
Elucidating and controlling the selective electrocatalytic reduction of CO2 to C1 chemical intermediates
09:00am - 09:30am USA / Canada - Eastern - August 22, 2021 | Room: B216 - B217
Matthew Neurock, Presenter
Division: [CATL] Division of Catalysis Science & Technology
Session Type: Oral - Hybrid
The development of sustainable strategies to meet the world’s increasing energy demands will require the use of renewable energy sources together with carbon-neutral and energy efficient processes that can significantly reduce CO2 emissions. The sustainable catalytic conversion of CO2 to carbon monoxide as well as formic acid and their subsequent transformation to fuels and chemical intermediates offer attractive routes to carbon-neutral fuels. Nature readily carries out these reactions out with very high selectivities by co-locating the active metal centers within highly reactive reaction cavities. Recent experimental results show that the CO2 can be efficiently reduced over various late transition metals within ionic liquid as well as within alkaline media. The metal-electrolyte-solvent interface plays a critical role in enhanced the CO2 reduction and selectively forming either CO or formic acid produces.
Novel potential-dependent ab initio molecular dynamics simulations are carried out herein to help unravel the elementary steps and the mechanisms that govern these transformations and to show how changes in the solvent, electrolyte, pH and potential drive the activity as well as the selectivity in these systems. We show how changes in the potential and the reaction conditions can drive the formation of unique electrolyte, solvent, reactant environments that readily facilitate the rate controlling electron transfer reaction and selectively guide the subsequent proton addition to exclusively form CO or formic acid products. The simulations combined with experiments show that subtle changes in the electrolyte and the solvent can be used to dictate the formation of CO or formic acid with Faradaic Efficiencies of > 97 %. The simulations are used to help identify important electrolyte and metal catalysts systems as well as mixed electrolyte systems that will drive the active and selective formation to C1 products.